Timing Belt Replacement 2.4 Mitsubishi – Questions and Answers

1:46 pm DIY, How To Auto Repair, Mistubishi, Timing Belt

2.4_Mitsubishi_Timing_Belt

© DenLorsTools.com  Summary: In this automotive repair article we cover timing belt R&R instructions on the Mitsubishi 2.4 L SOHC engine and the recommended replacement interval. We list the different makes and models that use this particular engine. Automotive repair questions and answers are included along with a diagram for timing belt marks.

The Mitsubishi 2.4 Liter SOHC engine is used in the Eclipse, Galant and Outlander. Many people are unaware that the engine is also used in the Chrysler Sebring and Dodge Stratus.  It’s important to know that the 2.4 is an interference engine that may end up with bent valves and possibly damaged pistons if the timing belt strips or breaks during driving. The motor includes a main timing belt and a smaller balance shaft belt. Both of these should be replaced at the same time. The manufacturer recommended replacement interval is every 60,000 miles.


The job of replacing the timing belts on just about any engine is basically the same, regardless of which vehicle it is in.

2.4_Mitsubishi_Timing_Belt_2

There are several precautions keep in mind. It’s always best to disconnect the battery’s ground cable, do not turn the crank shaft or camshaft with the timing belt removed. Some people prefer to remove the spark plugs to make the engine easier to turn although this is not necessary. Turn the crank shaft in the normal direction of rotation which is clockwise. Do not try to turn the crankshaft by turning the camshaft bolt. It’s always best to use tightening torque specifications provided by the manufacturer.

1. Raise and support the vehicle. If doing this at home use a floor jack and jack stands for safety. Then the right front wheel is removed and then the splash shield. It‘s easiest to loosen the water pump bolts before removing the accessory belts, otherwise the entire pulley will turn. Then remove the alternator, AC and power steering belts. After the belts are removed the upper timing cover can be taken off.

2. Always start with the engine at top dead center compression stroke with the timing marks aligned. Find top dead center by removing the #1 spark plug which is closest to the front of the engine and placing a screwdriver or 1/4″ extension down the hole. Turn the crank slowly and make sure it doesn’t bind – when the tool that was inserted reaches the highest point, top dead center is reached. Verify with marks.

3. Toward the engine with a block of wood on the floor jack positioned underneath the oil pan. Once the engine is lifted up slightly a motor mount can then be removed.

4. Leave the main crankshaft bolt in place. Remove the smaller bolts holding the crank pulley in place pulley to the side. Then remove the lower timing belt cover.

5. Now look for the timing belt marks and make sure they are aligned. I recommend making some of your own marks as well with white touch up paint or white out. Of course this will not be possible if replacing a broken or stripped belt. But when replacing a belt for maintenance I like the additional assurance, that the extra marks give me.

6. The main belt’s tensioner is hydraulic. The 12 mm bolts are removed and then he tensioner can be placed in a bench vice to be compressed. The pin to hold a tensioner in place is sometimes referred to by mechanics as grenade pins. Sometimes a small drill bit can be used instead of the specific pin. If you are replacing a tensioner it will come with the correct pin.

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84 Responses
  1. Mark :

    Date: September 21, 2009 @ 1:17 am

    Do you absolutely need the timing Belt Tensioner Set Screw tool?

  2. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: September 21, 2009 @ 6:16 am

    Mark, I’m not sure about a “set screw” (wasn’t mentioned in my article) but if you mean the pin… like I mentioned in step #6, a small drill bit can be used to hold the tensioner is place.

  3. WILDMAN :

    Date: September 23, 2009 @ 3:20 pm

    The Mitsubishi timing belt replacement info was great for anybody that does DIY work themselves. Great notes on how to and cautions taken to install the new timing belts. Awesome. Thanks for the info. Take care Tim.

  4. Deena James :

    Date: September 25, 2009 @ 10:36 pm

    I actually have a question instead of a comment.

    I recently (few months) ago, took my car to the dealer to have my 2004 Honda Civic timing belt replaced. Over the past few months I noticed a weird sound coming from my car. I took the car back to the dealer, but I was told nothing was wrong.

    Yesterday my car started making a “I am dying noise”. This time the dealer tells me that a pin in the timing belt cover has broken and caused damage to the timing belt, two bolts, and a listed of other problems (1300 dollars worth of repairs).

    Is it possible that errors made during the installation of my timing belt caused this current problems?

  5. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: September 26, 2009 @ 7:02 am

    Deena, anytime someone works in a particular area on a car and then there is a problem in that same area, it is reasonable to question if they were at fault.

    If the parts that failed are typically “non wearing” meaning that they normally are never replaced unless damaged by a different component or action like a belt rubbing it, impact damage or overtightening bolts (especially if metal sleeves are missing in the timing cover) then you may have an argument. With the above in mind, ask “what was the cause of failure?”

    Usually the shop will have at least a 3 month 3,000 mile warranty on the labor for most repairs. If they cannot explain what the cause of failure was, since they were just working in the area, I would attempt to have them at least cover the labor for the repairs.

    I hate when people are just out to get something for nothing, but fair is fair and if they were at fault you deserve to have the repair taken care of. You may want to elevate your complaint to upper management or their corporate office if needed. Remember the squeaky wheel gets the oil.

  6. tony :

    Date: October 2, 2009 @ 12:46 pm

    I have a 3.0 (181ci) mitsubishi engine in my Chrysler Sebring lxi. Is this a non interference engine. That means the valves won’t slap the pisons if it breaks correct?
    Thanks.

  7. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 3, 2009 @ 7:39 am

    Tony, The Mitsubishi 3.0 is an inteference engine, which means the valves can hit the pistons if the timing belt breaks. Or if it jumps timing due to a failed water pump or idler pulley wearing excessively. We have a repair blog on the “Mitsubishi V-6 timing belt change” with more information. Some people will be surprised at the wide range of vehicles those engines are used in. Also, keep in mind that there is a chance that valve damage won’t occur when the timing belt breaks – the chances increase that there will be valve damage, the higher the RPMs are when it breaks. The slower the engine is turning (when the T-belt belt breaks) the better the chances are that the valves will be OK.

  8. jeff :

    Date: October 3, 2009 @ 10:26 am

    When changing a 2001 eclipse from a 2.4 manual motor… putting in a motor from a 2003 2.4 galant i was told that I need to change the reluctor wheel… any help on that or where it is located?

  9. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 3, 2009 @ 12:25 pm

    Jeff, The reluctor wheel is the metal piece that is positioned behind the lower timing belt pulley (pictured above between #6 & #7). You can see the crank sensor in that picture as well (see the wires going to it on the right side of the pulley). If the reluctor is different, then it would stand to reason that the crank sensor must be different too. You could have someone at a parts store look up the crank sensor for both models to see if they use different part numbers or the same. If they use the same part number, then you shouldn’t have to switch the reluctors or crank sensors when doing the motor swap.

  10. Max :

    Date: October 4, 2009 @ 2:41 am

    I swapped engines on my 02 Mitsubishi eclipse 2.4 liter, 4 cyl with a 99 Mitsubishi Galant 2.4 cyl, 4 cyl engine. The rpms are now at the 2,000 range when the car is just idling, (the throttle is adjusted to the needed tension). The computer shows that i need my crank and camshaft position sensors replaced, and the 02 heater circuit bank 1 sensor 1 replaced. Does an 02 Galant 2.4 cyl engine use different cam and crankshaft position sensors from the eclipse 2.4 engine? Or should the galant cps sensors work fine on the eclipse engine? Where can I find out this information?

    What cause the cps sensor to go bad?

    Also what makes an 02 sensor go bad, i mean it was fine before i swapped engines, and now suddenly it goes bad after swapping engines.. what could be the problem?

    Your answers will be greatly appreciated.
    Thank you.

  11. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 4, 2009 @ 12:13 pm

    You could have someone at a parts store look up the parts to make sure the part numbers are the same. Having both cam and crank sensor fault codes at the same time seems strange – you may have the wrong ones for the vehicle’s computer.

    The bank 1 Sensor 1 oxygen sensor fault code, could be a result of an air leak (if there’s a lean code) or an oil burning problem, injector problem etc. (if there is a rich code). Or maybe the O-2 sensor was just jarred during the motor swap causing it to go bad.

  12. Max :

    Date: October 13, 2009 @ 3:01 am

    I just changed the crank shaft position sensor, and my car is still idling at around 1.75 rpms, still too high. I am pretty sure the cam shaft position sensor works fine. Now all that’s left is to change the 02 sensor, but it leads me to think that if the rpms are high in idle position, then a new 02 sensor won’t change the rpms because it has nothing to do with rpms, or does it? If the 02 sensor has no effect on the rpms, then what else could be the problem that’s causing my eclipse to idle so high?

    Thanks again.

  13. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 13, 2009 @ 8:22 am

    Max, I wouldn’t think that the O-2 sensor would cause a high idle. The O-2 code code is probably a result of something else.

    1. If the timing is off by a tooth, the idle could be too high.

    2. Throttle plates or Idle Air Control could be sticking.

    3. Leaky fuel injectors – sometimes when using a junk yard motor, injectors will be pretty gummed up.

    4. An air/vacuum leak can cause high idle.

    5. Wiring connections or pinched wiring is always a concern, after a an engine swap. Also any ground straps not secured can cause sensors not to picked up properly by the computer.

    6. Could be the coolant temperature reading inaccurately. If the computer sees the temp as too low, it will raise the idle until operating temperature is reached. If I was checking the car the temperature is one thing I would check, using a scan tool with data screen access. Should read 185 to 212 degrees F. Also make sure all the air is bled out of the cooling system.

    Hope the above ideas help. If you are still having problems you may want to use our question and answers page to get help from a Mitsubishi Dealer Tech.

  14. brian :

    Date: October 14, 2009 @ 11:25 pm

    Hi I have been changing my 2001 mitsubishi galant’s balance shaft belt and am having a hard time setting the timing back on the car, i thought that i had it but now the car will not start what should i do next?

  15. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 15, 2009 @ 6:36 am

    Brian, the most likely problem would be the belt timing is off. If the car was running perfectly fine before a maintenance timing belt was done – it is most likely you are off a tooth or more. If I was checking it at this point, I would recheck the work that was done including double checking the marks, crank sensor connections etc. If this doesn’t help, you may want to get some advice from someone from our Car Repair Questions/Answers page. They will have more time to provide a more detailed run-down.

  16. brian :

    Date: October 15, 2009 @ 10:14 pm

    thank you for your help it has been very helpful

  17. jason :

    Date: October 16, 2009 @ 10:01 pm

    hey dennisb, i just replaced my timing belt, crank sensor and all my other belts and plugs and coils on my 00 gallant.(2.4l) i have no compression on number 3 cylinder where as i have 150-175 on the others. do you think i have valve or piston trouble. i took valve cover off and watched rocker arms move up and down. please help!!!

  18. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 17, 2009 @ 6:54 am

    Jason, like mentioned in the article, this is an interference engine. The valves most likely hit the piston when the original timing belt broke. The rocker arms may still move up and down, but one or more of the valves could be bent (See our article on checking for bent valves). Only a couple of thousands of an inch variation can allow the cylinder to lose it’s compression. This is because the valve may not be seating properly and therefore not sealing like it should. The valve guide may also be damaged as a result of the bent valve.

    1. A compression leak down tester (different than a compression tester) can be used to help determine if the intake valve, exhaust valve or both are the the problem.
    2. Many technicians like to use a borescope or video inspection camera to look down the spark plug hole. Marks or scores on the top of the piston can indicate if the valves crashed into the piston.

    However, if the valves are damaged, the cylinder head unfortunately would need to be removed and taken to a machine shop for a valve job. When the head is off the top of the piston and cylinder walls can be inspected for damage.

  19. brian :

    Date: October 26, 2009 @ 10:08 am

    Hi dennis,u have recently helped me with the timing on my 2001 galant, I succeeded in changing the timing belt and with a little help it was set correctly, now it is shutting down after it heats up, it seems to want to stall, it is bucking and making a ticking noise and overheating. Would you know where I should go next?

  20. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 27, 2009 @ 6:48 am

    Brian, I would make sure all the air is bled out of the cooling system and the cooling fans are coming on. A thermostat stuck closed could cause overheating – a restricted catalytic converter could cause over-heating as well.

    I have an article on Bleeding Air Out of Cooling Systems, over on our main site that may help. Also another article that comes to mind when you say “ticking” is one about a Chrysler 300 making a ticking noise and overheating – it may not be the same issue but it is a quick read and may give you ideas on diagnosing.

  21. Pete :

    Date: October 31, 2009 @ 5:19 pm

    Yes i have a 2000 galant 2.4L and the comment on the high idle if it is off.. it also could be low and have loss in power till 3300rpm then it takes off, it does not ping, would it be retarded one tooth or 2 on the crank?

  22. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 31, 2009 @ 6:01 pm

    Pete, if the timing is retarded the idle could be low, could have a loss in power and most likely wouldn’t ping. Usually if the timing is advanced too much (at least in older non computerized cars) the idle would be high, you would experience a lot of pinging and but probably wouldn’t notice a loss of power – the vehicle would most likely overheat quickly also.

    Since your car is obviously computerized, if the timing belt was off by a tooth or two there should be multiple fault codes indicating there’s a problem.

  23. Russell :

    Date: November 1, 2009 @ 4:32 pm

    Hi I have a question about my 1995 Galant, The car Runs fine and has no loss of power or overheating but when it is idling there is a fairly loud ticking noise. I thought it was coming from the alternator or one of the tensioner pulleys but I removed the belts and it still makes the same noise and sounds like it’s coming from the timing cover so I removed the top plastic timing cover to check the belt and it shows no signs of wear and all the belts teeth look fine, there isn’t anything obvious like something broken or missing teeth and the belt is tight.. if you have any idea of whats causing this problem any help would be great. Since it’s started this ticking noise Ive drove the car around 2,500 miles and all seems well except the noise which is loudest at idle and low RPM’s.. Thank you

  24. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: November 1, 2009 @ 4:43 pm

    Russell, these cars are notorious for valve noise, sometimes caused by hydraulic lifters leaking down and sometimes just from low oil level. Even if the oil level is full, engine oil can break down over time, so I would change the oil and filter and see if the noise has changed or maybe even goes away. Other than that if you still think the noise is coming from the front and not the top – use a stethoscope to pinpoint where the noise is coming from.

  25. Russell :

    Date: November 2, 2009 @ 9:06 am

    Thanks dennis, I did change the oil and filter last week but havnt done the stethoscope to see if i could pin point where the noise is coming from. The Tech at Goodyear said he thinks it the timing belt but as I has said before I checked it and there isnt any wear or broke teeth and I had also forgot to mention that going down the hwy there is a small roaring sound but not very loud but at idle it will tick very loud and when the rpms are uped just a little it goes away but thanks again and ill do the stethoscope to see if I can pin point where its coming from.. It sounds just like a altenator barring going bad but I know thats not it since I took the belts off to make sure it didnt need a new one.. if the sound is coming from the timing cover do you think maybe a tensioer has or is going bad on the timing belt? and if it’s coming from the top the valves are bad? Thanks again for your help..

  26. ross :

    Date: November 2, 2009 @ 9:18 pm

    I have two chrysler sebrings with the 4g64 2.4 mitsubishi motors. I am going to do the timing belts on both of them this winter. Your article is very helpful. Thank you!

  27. dennisb :

    Date: November 4, 2009 @ 9:26 am

    Russell, You may have several issues. Since the ticking goes away when the idle is raised, this indicates the one or more of the lifters are losing their prime and only when higher oil pressure is introduced they pump up sufficiently (and the valves quieten down). As far as the other alternator bearing type noise, it could be a worn idler bearing for the timing belt or a worn bearing in the waterpump. Either use the stethoscope or remove the timing belt and feel all the pulleys and water pump for roughness.

  28. david :

    Date: November 8, 2009 @ 7:43 am

    i have a question i lost the timing marks and have to get them aligned how do i get to do that

  29. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: November 8, 2009 @ 10:33 am

    David, For a large pdf of the timing belt marks click the timing belt break-down image in the article.

  30. Corey :

    Date: November 12, 2009 @ 2:10 pm

    I replaced the timing belt and balancer belt on a 2.4l 2000 Galant, all the marks were lined up. Now the engine won’t idle. Runs fine above 1000rpm + drives fine but dies when it goes to idle. Ran fine until the belt broke. Compression is 150psi in all 4 cylinders. Do you think I am off a tooth or two. No codes. Or should I look somewhere else.

  31. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: November 12, 2009 @ 3:03 pm

    I would recheck the timing marks if there is any doubt – the fact that you mentioned being off a tooth or two, indicates you’re not sure. Codes can sometimes take awhile to set. If the timing marks are correct, you may also want to read our checking for bent valves article.

  32. Kris :

    Date: November 15, 2009 @ 2:21 am

    Great site. I’m doing one myself on a 2000 mitsubishi galant timing belt and this info is very helpful, thanks.

  33. Gerald :

    Date: November 15, 2009 @ 7:56 pm

    Thank You !

  34. lora :

    Date: November 20, 2009 @ 4:49 pm

    My timing belt on 1990 Celica broke. Since the mechanic replaced it, the engine vibrates very bad and it idles higher than it ever has before. We took it back to the mechanic and he said that he checked the timing with timing light and it is perfect. What could be going on? Could the belt be off a notch or two and still time perfectly? HELP please.

  35. Peter :

    Date: December 14, 2009 @ 12:08 pm

    The 2.4 litre engine is NOT used in the Dodge Stratus and Chrysler Sebring models. They use Chrysler’s own 2.4 l engine which is completely different and is NOT an interference engine. Also, the Chrysler engine requires timing belt changing every 90,000 miles, not 60,000 for the Mitsubishi engine.

  36. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: December 14, 2009 @ 12:45 pm

    Excerpt from a 2002 Mitsubishi press release.

    “The engine will be a state-of-the-art aluminium engine with displacements of 1.8, 2.0 and 2.4 liters in the range of 120 to 165 horsepower. With this range of displacement, each company will utilize the engine in a wide variety of vehicles for various market segments. The modern aluminium design will enhance fuel efficiency and provide improved performance.

    Each company will produce the engine for its own vehicles with the total production of engines expected to approach 1.5 million units annually, making this engine one of the most utilized in the industry. The companies expect that through sharing a common design, the aggregate volume will provide opportunities for synergies based on economies of scale that will benefit each company.”

    Click here to read the entire press release.

    Not interference, but not wise to turn cams independently. The applications listed below was provided by the timing belt manufacturer. 60,000 mile interval recommended for severe service.

    2.4 Mitsubishi Engines are used in the following vehicles. Mitsubishi Eclipse 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004 & 2005 – Galant 99,00,01, 02, 03, 04 & 05 – Outlander 2003 Chrysler Sebring 2001, 02, 03, 04 & 2005 – Dodge Stratus 2001, 02, 03, 04 & 05

  37. Wolfe :

    Date: January 16, 2010 @ 3:41 am

    i Changed the t/b in my brothers 96 spyder eclipse 2.4L but now all it does is crank. all timing marks are alighned. Do you have any idea what the problem is. It was running fine before the t/b broke.

  38. tom :

    Date: January 18, 2010 @ 2:41 am

    I have a timing issue with a 1994 2.4 mitsubishi galant. The belt broke and I replaced it I put the timing marks according to the diagram but I cant tell where the balance shaft mark is The engine has vibration when running. I checked the compression around 115 on all. Would the valves be bent and still have compression? And where is the balance marks/ How are the shafts tied togetther? Thanks Tom

  39. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: January 18, 2010 @ 7:31 am

    Tom, you may have answered your own question.

    You said “I cant tell where the balance shaft mark is”

    If the balance shaft is not properly lined up, the engine will most likely vibrate.

    You may want to ask a Mitsubishi tech for more help using our “Car Qusetions Page.”

  40. chris medina :

    Date: January 19, 2010 @ 10:27 pm

    When replacing everthing how does the hydraulic tensioner go back to its original position?

  41. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: January 20, 2010 @ 7:57 am

    Chris, the pin talked about in #6 is removed and the hydraulic pressure forces the rod outwards.

    “6. The main belt’s tensioner is hydraulic. The 12 mm bolts are removed and then he tensioner can be placed in a bench vice to be compressed. The pin to hold a tensioner in place is sometimes referred to by mechanics as grenade pins. Sometimes a small drill bit can be used instead of the specific pin. If you are replacing a tensioner it will come with the correct pin.”

    Only remove the pin when the belt and eccentric pulley are in position properly.

  42. joey riley :

    Date: January 22, 2010 @ 12:20 am

    I have a 97 Galant with a 2.4 interference engine and I was wondering if there is any other way I can check for vlalve damage without having to buy any extra tools cuz I am a do it yourself person with a lot of knowledge but without the special tools.

  43. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: January 22, 2010 @ 7:18 am

    Joey, in most cases auto repair shops try a new timing belt. In the process a cam binding when attempting to line up the marks could be found. Otherwise, a new belt is installed and the engine is hopefully started – if it runs smooth, there’s no bent valves. If it runs rough, further checking may be required.

  44. Greg :

    Date: January 24, 2010 @ 6:54 pm

    This was a great set of instructions. I have a Chiltons manual for my car, and it sounded a lot more complicated than your directions here. Followed each step and changed it without any issues. Thanks!

  45. Ralph Salmon :

    Date: January 27, 2010 @ 1:18 am

    Hi thanks for the info I have to agree with Greg its way better than the manual cuts out all the junk.I have a question ,would a bad balance shaft belt cause a 02 Galant 2.4L to have very loud noise like a loud exhaust with a lot of vibration?Thanks Ralph

  46. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: January 27, 2010 @ 2:10 pm

    Ralph, a broken balance shaft belt could definitely cause vibration, but I wouldn’t see how it could cause noise like you are describing.

  47. Wayne :

    Date: January 29, 2010 @ 8:28 am

    I have a 2002 galant and believe I have lost the timing between the crankshaft and camshaft if so how do I check to verify this and if so how do restore it to proper timing.
    Thanks,
    Wayne

  48. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: January 30, 2010 @ 10:20 am

    Wayne, I would pull the timing covers and check the marks.

  49. ERIC :

    Date: March 8, 2010 @ 2:24 pm

    I recently replaced timing belts on 2.4 sohc stratus. Now i feel vibration on hard accelerations could the internal balancer be off a tooth causing this or maybe belts too tight?

  50. John :

    Date: March 19, 2010 @ 5:39 pm

    I have 99 galant 2.4.I changed my lifters cause they were noisy. Start back up blew 2 coils? I have misfire on cylinder 2.. Took to shop no oil compression?? Any ideas any help appreciated

  51. Kamera :

    Date: March 28, 2010 @ 4:46 pm

    I am getting ready to start the process of changing my t/b in a 2001 Mits Galant. I have replaced a clutch in a 95 saturn, and done other small repairs to verious cars, but I have to admit this is the first time I have taken on a project inside the engine with this much complexity. I am unaware of how to use the bench vice to compress the main belt’s tensioner (described in #6.) Prior to starting I am wondering if this will be a no-brainer once I see the real thing vs seeing it in 2D, or is there more to it. I have to admit the fact that some call the pin a “grenade pin” does scare me a bit. Thanks for all the tips and help.

  52. Jillian :

    Date: March 29, 2010 @ 5:24 pm

    I have a question. I just got my 06 galant back from having the timing belt replaced. As I was driving it home after school, the car suddenly lost power, including brakes. I coasted to the side of the road and was able to start it back up and drive it home. Anyone know what’s wrong?

  53. Chris :

    Date: March 29, 2010 @ 9:16 pm

    I just replaced both the timing and balance shaft belts on my 2001 galant. The car ran perfect before, and it seems to run normally after the change, except it vibrates as a function of engine RPM. I am 99% confident the timing marks are all aligned, and the balance belt was tightened to roughly 1/4″ slack (maybe a little more). Any ideas on what could be the root cause?

  54. Bryan :

    Date: April 14, 2010 @ 10:18 pm

    Hey Dennis recently chaned my timing belts and pullies the belt had broken while I was drivng around 60mph and I feel very fortunate for not breaking anything else, but anyways I have an 02 Eclipse 2.4liter 5spd and I was wanting to know if rebuilding the engine while I only have 181,000 miles would really be necessary. I mean I want to be able to get through the gears without it taking awhile I guess I want to ask if that type of engine is really worth building it up to a performance 4cyl engine I want to be able to keep up with a Mustang or Trans Am. I want to turn it into a fast car thats also for show I guess I’d like some tips mainly on the performance of the engine.
    It would be very greatly appriciated.

  55. Wayne :

    Date: October 10, 2010 @ 7:21 pm

    I have 2000 galant 2.4. the balance shaft belt broke. It messed up the crank sensor. If the balance shaft belt broke will that cause th valves to bend?

  56. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 10, 2010 @ 9:00 pm

    Wayne, the balance shaft belt breaking should not cause any problems with bent valves as long as it did not make the main timing belt jump any teeth. The most common way to determine if there’s a problem is to replace the belts (and in your case the crank sensor) and see if it runs OK. Good Luck.

  57. Kevin :

    Date: October 11, 2010 @ 11:13 am

    Question:- Mitsubishi 2.4i petrol SOHC.

    Why is it important to have the oil pump to line up with the timing marks, surely it is just a positive displacement pump?

  58. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 11, 2010 @ 12:08 pm

    Kevin, good question. My guess would be that it may cause a balancing issue.

  59. Aisha :

    Date: October 17, 2010 @ 9:50 pm

    Is the 2000 Mitsubishi galant timing cover
    the same a the 2001?

  60. BRETT :

    Date: November 16, 2010 @ 11:04 pm

    Hey DennisB, I Have a Mitsubishi Galant 99 and It has a slight ticking noise at an idle, it also has an oil leak which appears to be coming from the camshaft seal when I checked it over. With this oil leak in mind could it have caused any damage to a journal or lifter? I want to replace the seal and change the t-belts but I just wanted a second opinion before I go getting into an interference motor “PAIN IN THE ASS” LOL. Anyways, your article was very helpful, if you get back to me I would be thankful.

  61. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: November 17, 2010 @ 7:28 am

    Brett, thanks for the comment and question. Yes, if the oil has been ran low for an extended period of time damage can be done to lifters and other internal engine components. However, Mitsubishi motors are known for lifter noise. Since noisy hydraulic lifters are so common with these engines, that’s most likely the problem (probably not caused by a leak). Sometimes lifters are noticeably more quiet right after an oil change. If noise is still there after a fresh oil change, it’s probably time to change the lifters. Typically, lifters will be the loudest at idle and quieten down when the RPM’s are raised. Good Luck.

  62. Dave Boberg :

    Date: November 17, 2010 @ 3:12 pm

    My 92 Mighty Max w/ a 2.4 liter just had the timing belt break. It just stalled.Will I not know if there was any valve damage until I put the new belt on and start it ? Also , there was no balancer belt. I’ve been driving this truck for a little over 10,000 miles and it has always ran very smooth. Is the balacer belt really needed ?

  63. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: November 17, 2010 @ 3:31 pm

    The easiest way to see if it has a problem is to replace the timing belt and see how it runs. As far as the balance shaft belt, I know of no one that has experimented running a 2.4 without one. Doesn’t make sense to leave off the balance shaft belt, considering the minimal cost and the possibility of issues later.

  64. Dave Boberg :

    Date: November 21, 2010 @ 3:36 pm

    Should there be a grommet for the bolt that holds the balance shaft tensioner ? I noticed some oil seepage coming out of that hole when I removed the bolt and tensioner. I would think there should be some type of seal there.

  65. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: November 21, 2010 @ 7:04 pm

    Not sure if there should be a grommet or not. I know that sometimes some RTV sealant can be used for bolts that may enter coolant passages. I would probably coat the threads with RTV just to be safe.

  66. brian :

    Date: November 23, 2010 @ 9:01 pm

    what pulley is number 7 when looking at the timing belt diagram above the timing belt q and a? i have a lot of noise coming from this pulley and there are a lot of metal shavingsaround the back of that pulley.

    -brian

  67. dennisb :

    Date: November 24, 2010 @ 9:32 am

    Brian, the meaning of “OP” on the pulley is Oil Pump. Metal shavings are most likely from the shaft bearing. This is a more involved repair. You may want to get an online subscription of Mitchell or AllData for repair instructions and torque specs. See the repair manual info page for details. Good Luck.

  68. Nicholas :

    Date: November 25, 2010 @ 12:25 am

    Would this be the same process for a 94 mitsu mighty max with the 2.4 obviously the engine in this truck wouldnt be sideways. I mean as far as the procedure being the same. Also my belt is not broken but it is running rough i have tried all the normal stuff plugs wires etc and think the belt may have skipped. Could you be more specific on how to check to if it skipped a tooth?

  69. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: November 25, 2010 @ 8:03 am

    Nicholas, the procedure is basically the same. I recommend getting an on-line subscription to All Data or Mitchell – linked from our car repair manual page. This way you will be able to look up specific directions and see diagrams of the pulley marks for your make, model and engine size. You would then check the timing marks as described in the timing belt R&R instructions. You would also have access to ALL repair info, not just t-belt related. Good Luck.

  70. BRETT :

    Date: November 27, 2010 @ 7:00 pm

    thnx for the help dude i just changed the belts and seals and water pump it finally went out .lol the lifters are next i guess

  71. Danielle :

    Date: December 7, 2010 @ 4:29 pm

    I have been trying to find a lower timing cover to this engine. Where can I find a part number/and or a list of cars that would have the same timing cover.

  72. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: December 7, 2010 @ 8:23 pm

    Danielle, I would check with the dealer.

    Not available aftermarket.

  73. corey :

    Date: December 21, 2010 @ 10:52 am

    Hi, I just had to replace my head on my mitsu galant 2.4. How do I know if cam is at tdc (Top Dead Center) is the exhaust valves on #1 cyl gonna be open?

  74. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: December 21, 2010 @ 9:42 pm

    Corey, I would check the service manual for the marks for your particular car.

  75. Rick :

    Date: December 22, 2010 @ 11:37 pm

    2003 Eclipse, 2.4L, when engine is cold, car starts and runs fine, doesnt stall; shut engine off when engine is warm and try to re-start, car will turn over and fire once but not re-start; after engine cools for about 30 minutes, starts and runs fine. Any ideas?

  76. mindy :

    Date: January 21, 2011 @ 1:10 pm

    2003 mitsubishi galant 2.4L stalled, got towed and won’t start anymore. OBD shows P0335 cpk sensor malfunction. Checked t-belt looks ok, don’t know about balancer belt. Could it just be a failed CPK? Thanks.

  77. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: January 21, 2011 @ 1:21 pm

    Mindy, many times the belt may look ok but is actually stripped. I would see if the cam moves when cranking the engine over. If the belt is definitely good, with no stripped teeth, then it could be a bad CKP sensor (Crankshaft Position Sensor). And no, the balance shaft belt being bad would not cause the engine not to run, it would shake badly though.

  78. Rob :

    Date: September 3, 2014 @ 2:03 am

    I have a 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse 2.4L that broke the timing belt and of course the balance shaft belt also.
    The information and diagram that you provided was extremely helpful and I am very grateful for the information. This page was all I needed to replace the belts and get my car running again.
    THANK YOU,
    Rob

  79. jessie sibley :

    Date: September 3, 2014 @ 10:21 pm

    My timing belt broke on me the other day and I was wondering how to replace bent valves… not sure if I have any yet but rather find out how to now before I get into the job. My car is a 99 Mitsubishi Galant ES 2.4 liter. Thanks

  80. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: September 4, 2014 @ 7:25 am

    Hello Jessie. We actually have an article on how to tell if thre are bent valves. One way is with an inspection camera, looking down into each cylinder. If the top of the piston has been hammered by the valve you can bet there’s at least one bent valve. See the repair article on how to tell if the engine has bent valves for more information. If your valves are bent the cylinder head will need to be removed and taken to a machine shop. The will replace any bent valves, guides etc. Then you can re-install the cylinder head and replace the timing belt. This is not a normal DIY job. It’s much more involved than just changing a timing belt. So anyone with little experience working on cars should probably take the car to a shop for the work to be done. Good Luck.

  81. Shane :

    Date: September 28, 2014 @ 3:16 pm

    I just replaced the oil pump, water pump, balance shaft belt and timing belt. I put the No. 1 piston top dead with both valves closed, the cam marks are lined up with the dowels facing up, balance shaft is lined up, oil pump mark is on and the crank mark is on. Car cranks like it has no compression, what did I do wrong?

  82. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: September 29, 2014 @ 7:17 am

    Shane, since it sounds like no compression the timing is most likely off. Good Luck.

  83. Kenny :

    Date: October 15, 2014 @ 9:00 pm

    I replaced head on 07 eclipse now I’m getting fire but don’t act like getting fuel and it won’t start. Does anyone know what it is?

  84. dennisb - Auto Tool Sales :

    Date: October 16, 2014 @ 7:42 am

    One easy way to check if fuel is the problem is to try to start it momentarily with starting fluid. If it trys to start, then you know that fuel is what’s missing. However, the most likely thing that comes to mind is that the timing could be off. Good Luck.

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